Archive of iPod Rumors

Today marks the 16th anniversary of the debut of the first iPod, which was introduced by Apple on October 23, 2001. Then Apple CEO Steve Jobs stood on stage at the Apple Town Hall in Cupertino and showed off a device that could fit in a pocket but hold an entire music library.


The first-generation iPod, which Apple advertised with the tagline "1,000 songs in your pocket," was a rectangle-shaped device with a 5GB 1.8-inch hard drive capable of holding 1,000 songs.


It featured a black and white LCD and the first click wheel, a mechanical scrolling interface that let users quickly and conveniently scroll through long lists of music. The click wheel also included easy access buttons for playing, pausing, rewinding, and fast forwarding through music content. The first iPod's battery lasted for up to 10 hours before needing to be recharged, and the device was priced at $399.

When Steve Jobs introduced the iPod, he called it a quantum leap forward and outlined three major breakthroughs: ultra-portability, Apple's legendary ease of use, and auto-sync with iTunes.

iPod is an MP3 music player, has CD quality music, and it plays all of the popular formats of open music. The biggest thing about iPod is that it holds a thousand songs. Now this is a quantum leap because for most people, it's their entire music library. This is huge. How many times have you gone on the road with a CD player and said 'Oh God, I didn't bring the CD I wanted to listen to.' To have your whole music library with you at all times is a quantum leap in listening to music. The coolest thing about iPod is that your whole music library fits right in your pocket. Never before possible.
New versions of the iPod were released on a yearly basis following the launch of the original device, and other notable launches included the iPod Photo in 2004, which had the first color display, the smaller iPod mini in 2004, the tiny iPod nano in 2005, the even smaller iPod Shuffle, also in 2005, and the first iPod touch, which came out in 2007 following the launch of the iPhone.

An early version of the iPod Nano

Today, the iPhone, unveiled six years after the iPod, has largely replaced Apple's original music device. The iPhone does everything the iPod did and more, and has served as an iPod replacement since its debut.


Over the course of the last 16 years, Apple has stayed at the forefront of music technology with the debut of Apple Music, a streaming music service that now has more than 30 million paid subscribers.

Apple retired the iPod nano and the iPod shuffle in July of 2017, and now the iPod touch is the sole remaining iPod the company has for sale. The iPod touch was last updated in July of 2015 and it is not clear if the product will see additional updates in the future.


The iPod touch is available in 32GB and 128GB capacities for $199 and $299, respectively.
The sixth-generation iPod nano is officially obsolete, meaning Apple will no longer repair or service the portable media player.


Apple added the sixth-generation iPod nano to its internal vintage and obsolete products list on August 30, according to a memo distributed to Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers seen by MacRumors.

Apple repairs and services products for up to five years after they are no longer manufactured. The sixth-generation iPod nano was released in September 2010 and discontinued in September 2012.

As required by statute, sixth-generation iPod nano owners in California may still obtain service from Apple Stores or by contacting AppleCare at 1-800-APL-CARE. The extended coverage period will likely end in September 2019.

The sixth-generation iPod nano was notable for its square-shaped design. A number of third-party straps and accessories were released that essentially turned the device into a very early version of the Apple Watch.


Unlike the fifth-generation iPod nano, the sixth-generation model lacked a click wheel, video camera, and speaker. Instead, it had a touchscreen and adopted the iPod shuffle's clip to make it wearable on the go.

Apple returned to a rectangular design for the seventh-generation iPod nano, and added a Home button to the device. The design remained the same until Apple discontinued the entire iPod nano and iPod shuffle lineups in July.

Apple has yet to list the sixth-generation iPod nano on its public vintage and obsolete products list, but the device will likely be added soon.
Apple today tweaked its iPod touch storage and pricing configurations after discontinuing the iPod nano and iPod shuffle.


Apple's new iPod touch lineup is priced as following in the United States:

• 32GB: $199
• 128GB: $299
• 16GB and 64GB discontinued

Apple's previous iPod touch lineup was priced as following:

• 16GB: $199
• 32GB: $249
• 64GB: $299
• 128GB: $399

The new configurations are currently in stock on Apple's online store in the same colors as previously: Silver, Gold, Space Gray, Pink, Blue, and Red.

Apple last updated the iPod touch in July 2015 with an Apple A8 chip and 8-megapixel rear-facing iSight camera.
Apple today removed the iPod nano and iPod shuffle from its website and online store around the world, and it has since confirmed the iconic portable media players have been discontinued. Apple continues to sell the iPod touch with updated pricing and storage, including a 32GB model for $199 and 128GB model for $299.


For now, it appears the iPod nano and iPod shuffle are still available to purchase at many Apple Stores and other resellers, but that likely won't be the case for too much longer. In the United States, the latest iPod nano started at $149 with 16GB of storage, while the iPod shuffle cost $49 with 2GB of storage.


Beyond new colors and storage capacities, Apple had last updated the iPod nano in October 2012 and the iPod shuffle in September 2010. Apple last updated the iPod touch in July 2015 with an A8 chip and an 8-megapixel rear camera.

Apple introduced the iPod shuffle in January 2005, followed by the iPod nano in September 2005. In total, there were seven generations of the iPod nano, and four generations of the iPod shuffle.


iPod sales had been declining for several years. Apple reported 2.6 million iPods sold in the fourth quarter of 2014. Since then, Apple has grouped iPod sales under its "Other Products" category in earnings results. iPod sales peaked at 54.8 million in 2008, compared to 14.3 million in 2014.

The success of the iPod, first introduced in 2001 by the late Steve Jobs, helped Apple reestablish itself as one of the world's most successful technology companies at the turn of the millenium. But, after the iPhone launched in 2007, the iPod nano and iPod shuffle became increasingly niche products.

Update: "Today, we are simplifying our iPod lineup with two models of iPod touch, now with double the capacity starting at just $199, and we are discontinuing the iPod shuffle and iPod nano," an Apple spokesperson told Business Insider.
Apple recently removed its first-generation iPod nano replacement program from its support website, over five years after it started.

ipod_nano_replacement_notice
MacRumors contacted a few Apple Authorized Service Providers that confirmed the program has indeed ended, and we were advised to contact Apple directly. Apple's support team initially informed us the program is no longer in place, but a senior AppleCare advisor honored the program after we escalated our request.

In other words, if you still have a twelve-year-old iPod nano, you may be in luck still, but it could take some persistence to reach the right person.

The replacement program was launched worldwide in November 2011 after Apple determined that, in very rare cases, the battery in the first-generation iPod nano may overheat and pose a safety risk. The manufacturing defect is limited to iPod nano models sold between September 2005 and December 2006.
Apple recently updated its online refurbished store in the United States to include the sixth-generation iPod touch, offering discounts of $30 to $60 depending on model, which equates to savings of up to 16 percent.

Refurbished entry-level 16GB models can be purchased for as little as $169, a discount of $30 off of the retail price. 16, 32, 64, and 128GB capacities in a range of colors are available.

refurbishedipodtouch
First introduced in July of 2015, the sixth-generation iPod touch features a 6.1mm thick body with a 4-inch display, an A8 chip, and an 8-megapixel iSight camera.

Though the sixth-generation iPod touch has been available for more than a year, it appears to be a new addition to Apple's online refurbished store in the U.S. All refurbished Apple iPods include a new battery and outer shell plus all accessories and a full one-year warranty.
On Sunday, Apple's original iPod celebrated the 15th anniversary of its launch on October 23, 2001. The reveal of the iPod by former Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 2001 was preceded by the usual breadcrumb trail of mystery, rumors, and leaks, with most reports pointing to a new "breakthrough digital device" coming from the company later in the month. Apple even hinted itself that "it's not a Mac."

ipod-original
Some speculation went against rumors that the device would be an MP3 player, even suggesting it could be "something more sophisticated such as a component for a home digital stereo system." Still, most reports pointed toward the impending launch of the "iPod," a device that would allow customers to ditch their cumbersome CD players and listen to thousands of songs from one device in their pocket.


In the official keynote address, Jobs referred to the Mac as the focal point of the Apple customer's digital lifestyle, with the new iPod device as the ultra-portable, music-enabled addition to that lifestyle. The iPod launched for $399 with a 5GB hard drive that could hold up to 1,000 songs, a 10-hour battery life, a black and white LCD screen, came equipped with FireWire to enable a connection between it and iTunes on a Mac, and was the size of a deck of cards (2.4" wide, 4" tall, 3/4" thick).

A few individuals who were part of the iPod's launch looked back at the device over the weekend, although Apple itself remained silent on the topic. In the first official promotional video for the iPod, a collection of Apple executives and musicians -- including Phil Schiller, Jony Ive, and Moby -- are seen discussing the creation and impact of the device. Speaking with Entertainment Weekly, Moby remembers "how magical it was," and remarks on how much has changed with the iPod, and its successor in the iPhone, in 15 years.

“It’s a little disconcerting when I look back at the past, but the past still sounds like the future,” Moby says. “I remember when 2002 seemed like an unimaginably far time — like, really far away. Now it’s like a distant past.”

Technology is, obviously, the perfect physical encapsulation of this: “Remember those multicolored clamshell laptops that Apple had?” he says. “Now they seem old and clunky, like a weird pair of sneakers. But at the time, they just represented the future. The same thing with the iPod, at the time it was so futuristic, and now it just seems like an adorable relic.”
The first alternative iPod lineup, dubbed the iPod mini, debuted in 2004, followed by the iPod nano and iPod shuffle in 2005. The iPod touch was eventually introduced as a non-cellular counterpart to the company's iPhone, and became one of the longest-lasting iPod lines to date (six generations), tied with the classic line, but behind the iPod nano (seven generations).

In 2016, Apple still manufactures and sells the iPod touch, iPod nano, and iPod shuffle, but the three devices have long been removed from the main toolbar navigation on its website, and are now located under "Music." The three current iPods on sale bear little resemblance to the original device's famous click wheel interface, which was mechanical in the first generation and touch-sensitive in subsequent lines. The last iPod with a click wheel, the iPod Classic, was discontinued by Apple in 2014 and marked the sixth generation of the device.

The iPod began Apple's quest to make music a mainstay in its customers' lives by finding a seamless and effortless way for songs to be carried around, in opposition to the size of CD players and the general confusion at the time over how other MP3 players worked. Today, music is a bigger part of Apple than ever, with Apple Music slowly growing in subscribers and the iPhone now essentially the modern version of the original 5GB iPod from fifteen years ago.

This week at a Mac-focused event, it's also expected that the company will debut the wireless "AirPods." The Bluetooth device will be the newest implementation of its ubiquitous headphone line, which began alongside the iPod in 2001.
iFixit has posted a detailed teardown of the new sixth-generation iPod touch, confirming that the device has a 1,043 mAh rated lithium-ion battery and 1GB of SK Hynix LPDDR3 RAM. Comparatively, the fifth-generation iPod touch released in 2012 had a 1,030 mAh rated battery and 512MB of RAM.

iPod touch 6G Teardown
The teardown also provides a closer look at the new iPod touch's Apple A8 chip and M8 motion coprocessor (NXP Semiconductors LPC18B1UK ARM Cortex-M3 Microcontroller), Toshiba NAND flash memory, InvenSense MP67B 6-axis gyroscope and accelerometer, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi module, Broadcom and Texas Instruments touchscreen controllers and other components.

iPod touch 6G Logic Board
The new iPod touch received a relatively low repairability score of 4 out of 10, with ten being the easiest to repair, due to several components being soldered together, no external screws and ribbon cables that are difficult to remove. iFixit has posted detailed step-by-step teardown instructions for the new iPod touch and sells the required tools and parts for most do-it-yourself repairs on its website.
Apple earlier this week introduced the sixth-generation iPod touch, featuring a new A8 chip and M8 motion coprocessor, 8-megapixel rear-facing iSight camera and Bluetooth 4.1, in six colors: blue, gold, pink, red, silver and space gray. 16GB, 32GB, 64GB and 128GB models are available through the Apple Store and Apple Online Store for $199, $249, $299 and $399 respectively.

iPod touch 6th Gen
Apple's new sixth-generation iPod touch in blue and pink

The video below submitted by MacRumors reader Jacob Zacks takes a closer look at the new iPod touch colors and features. The existing silver color from 2012 has been complimented with space gray and gold models that match the new MacBook lineup, while the new blue and pink colors are much brighter and deeper than the fifth-generation iPod touch. The sixth color is (PRODUCT)RED and remains unchanged.


iPods have declined in sales and popularity since the iPhone was released, but the portable media players still fill a niche and were long overdue for an update. The sixth-generation iPod touch's most important new feature is the jump to an A8 chip, which delivers up to 10 times faster graphics performance and ensures the device will be capable of running iOS 9 and future software updates.

A recent benchmark test clocked the new iPod touch's A8 chip at 1.10GHz per core, slower than the 1.39GHz per core the iPhone 6 runs at, and confirmed it has 1GB of RAM. The new iPod touch is also the first iOS device to include the Bluetooth 4.1 specification, which is more reliable and offers less interference with LTE bands, improved power management and better data transfer.

iPod touch 6th Gens
Apple's new iPod touch no longer has a loop attachment on the back

Whether this is the last significant update to the iPod lineup remains to be seen, but for now the iPod touch lives on with a vibrant lineup of new colors and under-the-hood improvements. Apple Stores have begun receiving in-store stock of the new iPod touch this week, with Personal Pickup now available in the U.S., and all models and storage capacities currently ship within 1 business day on the Apple Online Store.
The new iPod touch with an A8 processor and upgraded 8-megapixel rear camera just launched this morning, but TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino already has one in hand and has run some benchmarks on the device.

According to early testing, the A8 processor in the new iPod touch appears to be running at 1.10GHz per core, which is slower than the 1.39GHz per core the iPhone 6 runs at, presumably to manage battery life. In Geekbench 3, the iPod touch scored 1379 on the single-core test and 2440 on the multi-core test right out of the box. The previous-generation A5 iPod touch scored 215/410 on Geekbench's single and multi-core tests, so the new sixth-generation iPod is six times faster and a massive improvement over the fifth-generation iPod.

ipodtouchgeekbench
Labeled as iPod7,1 instead of iPod6,1 as expected (the previous-generation iPod's model ID was iPod5,1), the new iPod touch ships with Apple's latest operating system, iOS 8.4, so it works with Apple Music out of the box. Like the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, the iPod touch has 1GB of RAM to go along with its A8 processor.

The new iPod also includes an M8 motion coprocessor for recording motion activity that's uploaded to the Health app, and it supports 802.11ac wireless. Its 64-bit A8 processor is a major improvement over the A5 processor in the older iPod touch, and it includes support for Metal, bringing much-improved games to the device.

ipodtouchgeekbenchinfo
The iPod touch has one feature that hasn't yet made it into other Apple products -- Bluetooth 4.1. It's the first of Apple's devices to offer the new specification. Bluetooth 4.1 is more reliable, offering less interference with LTE bands, improved power management, and better data transfer.

Available in several new colors, the iPod touch is priced at $199 for the 16GB model, $249 for the 32GB model, $299 for the 64GB model, and $399 for the 128GB model. It's available from the Apple online store beginning today.

Apple's also released new iPod nano and shuffle models in updated colors, but the internal components of those devices have not changed.
Apple today introduced the sixth-generation iPod touch with a 4-inch display, 64-bit A8 chip and M8 motion coprocessor, 8-megapixel rear-facing iSight camera and new colors: blue, pink, silver, space gray, gold and red. 16GB, 32GB and 64GB models are available through the Apple Online Store starting today for $199, $249 and $299 respectively, while a new larger 128GB model was introduced for $399.

ipodtouch1
The new iPod touch also features 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi‑Fi and Bluetooth 4.1, no longer has a loop attachment and comes with iOS 8.4 preinstalled for access to Apple Music and Beats 1. The 128GB and (PRODUCT)RED models will be sold exclusively through Apple, while all other colors and storage capacities should be available through authorized resellers such as Best Buy and Walmart in the near future.

iPods 2015
Apple also updated the iPod shuffle and iPod nano with a matching lineup of colors, but no other hardware or storage capacity changes to the devices were made. iPod nano and iPod shuffle maintain their prices of $149 and $49 respectively and currently ship within 1 business day on the Apple Online Store.
"iPod touch gives customers around the world access to Apple Music, the App Store and iOS, the world’s most advanced mobile operating system, starting at just $199,” said Greg Joswiak, Apple’s vice president of iPhone, iPod and iOS Product Marketing. “With big advancements like the A8 chip and the 8 megapixel iSight camera, customers can experience next-level gameplay, take even more beautiful photos and enjoy their favorite music, TV shows and movies.”
iPods have become an increasingly minor business for Apple over the past several years, with only 2.6 million units sold in Q4 2014, the last quarter when Apple reported iPod sales. Beyond new colors and storage capacities, Apple had last updated the iPod touch and nano in October 2012 and the iPod shuffle in September 2010.
The Apple Online Store was taken offline moments ago ahead of an expected refresh to the iPod touch, iPod nano and iPod shuffle lineup of portable media players. The sixth-generation iPod touch will likely feature a 64-bit processor, new colors and other hardware improvements, while the iPod nano and iPod shuffle are expected to be released in new colors only.

iPods Well Be Back
iPods discovered in unreleased colors (left) and Apple Store down (right)

iPods in unreleased colors were first spotted in iTunes 12.2 earlier this month, including a darker blue for the iPod touch, a new gold color for the iPod nano and a brighter pink color for the iPod shuffle. MacRumors subsequently discovered a full lineup of six new colors for the iPod touch, nano and shuffle hidden within iTunes resource files, including silver, space gray, red, bright pink, deep blue and light gold.